Building a trust with customer needs in 2021 

When you offer to provide your services to a potential customer, they have to believe that it will fulfill their needs. Customers buy things for what they can do for them rather than what the things are. They may, for example, want you to write a will for them - they want the feeling of security it provides them with. Or they may want to buy a home- knitted jumper from you rather than one from a high-street shop because they may believe that hand-knitted jumpers are better quality.You need to get people to trust that your services will provide them with exactly what they need.

Building a trust with customer needs in 2021 

Building a trust with customer needs in 2021 

 

When you offer to provide your services to a potential customer, they have to believe that it will fulfill their needs. Customers buy things for what they can do for them rather than what the things are. They may, for example, want you to write a will for them - they want the feeling of security it provides them with. Or they may want to buy a home- knitted jumper from you rather than one from a high-street shop because they may believe that hand-knitted jumpers are better quality.You need to get people to trust that your services will provide them with exactly what they need.

In order to develop a rapport:

You need to establish common ground with your potential customers.

  • You need to ask questions that will show that you are interested in their reasons for possibly wanting your services.
  • And you need to listen carefully to demonstrate that you understand what they are trying to get out of using your services.

Asking opening questions

Don’t you find people who only talk about themselves boring? Similarly, people with services to promote who only talk about their services will usually turn their prospective customers off. Giving the customer a chance to talk shows that you don’t fall into the stereotype of being a fast-talking salesperson.

You can’t meet a potential customer for the first time and launch abruptly into questions about what they need. Customers hate being treated as customers! They want to be treated as people. After thanking them for making the time to see you, you need to start with questions that will help them to get used to talking to you. It’s often a good idea to engage in ‘chit-chat’ on topics such as:

  • The weather - for example, ‘isn’t it cold today?’
  • Their journey - ‘did you find your way here okay?’
  • The place you’re meeting - ‘I like your offices. How long have you been here?’
  • Their work or business - ‘how are things going at work these days?’

If you have met the customer before - for example, if he or she is a friend or acquaintance of yours already - you could ask about the following as appropriate:

  • Their family - for example, ‘how are Ian and David getting on at school?’ or ‘are you and your husband still looking to buy a new house?’
  • Other interests of theirs - ‘do you still have time to play squash these days?’

Just think about what you talk about when you meet someone for the first time - you need at least a few minutes of general conversation before you can start delving into their needs. But although it’s a good idea to have some questions at the ready, don’t forget to be yourself! Customers are far more likely to buy from someone they like than someone who seems to be rattling off a list of rehearsed and standardized questions.