How To Exploring the customer's need in 2021

You need to get a good understanding of your customer’s business, but do it in a way that he or she does not think is overly intrusive. Before asking searching questions to establish why they might be interested in your services, you need to ask for permission to question them. For example: ‘Is it okay if I ask you some questions so that I understand your situation/business/circumstances/how I might be able to help you out?’ Asking questions in a three-step logical progression will avoid making the customer feel under too much pressure:

How To Exploring the customer's need in 2021

How To Exploring the customer's need in 2021

 

 

You need to get a good understanding of your customer’s business, but do it in a way that he or she does not think is overly intrusive. Before asking searching questions to establish why they might be interested in your services, you need to ask for permission to question them. For example: ‘Is it okay if I ask you some questions so that I understand your situation/business/circumstances/how I might be able to help you out?’

Asking questions in a three-step logical progression will avoid making the customer feel under too much pressure:

Gather the facts

Start with questions of a very general or factual nature. The next chapter will give you some tips on how to prepare good questions to ask. For example, if they are looking for a new supplier to help their business, ask questions such as:

  • How many employees do you have?
  • What’s the turnover of your business?
  • Who are your customers?
  • What exactly do you do for your customers?

These questions will help to build your understanding and start to get the customer used to talking openly about his or her situation.

Identify the need

Once you’ve gathered the facts you can move on to questions that try to examine the issue, problem, or need that has led to them agreeing to meet you. For instance:

  • What are the biggest problems you face in... ?
  • What do you most hate about the suppliers you currently deal with . . . ?
  • How satisfied are your customers with... ?

Get the customer to weigh up the need:

It’s a lot easier to persuade a customer to use your services if they believe that they themselves came up with the reasons for using them. So help them to figure out why it would be worth tackling the problem or need that they have. The following questions might be useful in helping your customer to weigh up the consequences of taking action: ~ What do you think would happen if you don’t tackle these problems?

  • What do you think would be the benefits of having a supplier who could do that?
  • What would it be worth if we could make your customers more satisfied?

Once you have got the customer to weigh up the need and the consequences of not tackling the need, your services will seem like welcome relief to their problems.