You Should be Know Customers by The Researching effectively

Customers like to talk to people who understand their needs and can ask sensible questions. They don’t want to have to explain everything from scratch. Neither do they want to be asked questions that only poorly prepared people would ask. Customers often talk in jargon or use phrases that are peculiar to their line of work and it’s essential that you have at least a basic grasp of what they are going on about. Finding something out about the customers you plan to meet will also help you to feel more confident when you meet them.

You Should be Know Customers by The Researching effectively

You Should be Know Customers by The Researching effectively

 

 

Customers like to talk to people who understand their needs and can ask sensible questions. They don’t want to have to explain everything from scratch. Neither do they want to be asked questions that only poorly prepared people would ask.

Customers often talk in jargon or use phrases that are peculiar to their line of work and it’s essential that you have at least a basic grasp of what they are going on about. Finding something out about the customers you plan to meet will also help you to feel more confident when you meet them.

There are two aspects to learning about your customer:

  1.  Learning about their line of work: It's important that you get to grips with the basic terminology of what your customer does for a living. For example, it might help you to write a brief glossary of jargon that you come across. Also think about recent developments or trends in their field of work. And try to figure out what problems people in their type of work may be experiencing at the moment. It will help you to ask the right questions.
  2.  Learning about the individual(s): Customers are people, and people have personalities. In meetings some people like to get to the point, while other people like to ramble. Some people may hate flashy business cards while others may be impressed by them. Trying to find out something about the people you meet will help you to deal with their individual idiosyncrasies.

Good sources of information can include:

  •  people you know who work in the same industry or line of business annual reports
  • the Internet
  • books, magazines, or trade journals - you could get these from libraries or direct from trade associations newspapers.
  • People who have met or heard about your intended customer, such as acquaintances, ex-colleagues or suppliers of theirs.